You Are What You Drink Blog Talk Radio Show

11/23/2009

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You Are What You Drink

11/21/2009

So you are probably wondering…..do the beverages I drink really make that much of a difference? They are only liquids, right? Liquids “go right through me” so how much of an ill effect can they have?

You have probably heard the old saying “You are what you eat?”  Well, it is true, but “You are what you drink” also!

 Beverage Guidance Panel

 The Beverage Guidance Panel is a group of nutrition experts from the United States, which formed several years ago.  The purpose of this group was to review the existing research to determine which beverages are considered healthy.  They based their recommendations on the number of calories, energy and nutrients provided and health benefits of different beverages.  The winner hands down was water.  But that doesn’t mean this is the only beverage we should drink.  The Beverage Guidance Panel developed a six-level pitcher for beverages similar to the food pyramid.  (Published in the March 2006 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Available online at www.beverageguidancepanel.org)

 The average adult should aim to drink 8 glasses of fluids every day.  The Beverage Guidance Panel recommends:

 Water: at least 4 (8 ounce) servings a day for women and 6 (8 ounce) servings a day for men

Unsweetened coffee or tea (iced or hot): up to 8 servings of tea or 4 servings of coffee per day

Low-fat Milk: up to 2 (8 ounce) servings per day

100% fruit or vegetable juice, whole milk, or sports drinks: up to 1 (8 ounce) serving per day

Carbonated soft drinks: up to 1 serving per day

Diet beverages with sugar substitutes: up to 4 (8 ounce) servings per day

Alcoholic beverages: up to 1 drink a day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men

Liquid or Empty Calories

In the United States about 20% of our daily caloric intake comes from beverages.  The Institute of Medicine recommends men have 13 cups (3 liters) of fluid every day and women have 9 cups (2.2 liters) of fluid every day. 

 Most experts now believe that part of the obesity problem in this country comes from the increased consumption of calorically sweetened beverages.  A recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (April 2009 issue) suggests that cutting back on liquid calories may actually result in greater weight loss.  The study evaluated 800 adult men and women for fruit and beverage intake and weight changes.  The results were interesting:

Cutting 100 calories a day from liquid intake lead to about a 0.5 pound weight loss at 6 and 18 months

Cutting 100 calories a day from solid food intake lead to about a 0.1 pound weight loss at 6 and 18 months

Eliminating one 12 ounce sugar-sweetened beverage a day lead to the greatest weight loss = 1 pound at 6 months and 1.5 pounds at 18 months

 If you are trying to lose weight you must remember to count your liquid calories!!

Should you drink wine?

Is it healthier to drink decaffeinated coffee or tea?

Does grapefruit juice really interfere with some medications?

Can diet soda really make you fat?

Is grape juice as good as red wine in preventing heart disease?

Can vegetable juice help promote weight loss?

Is organic milk really healthier?

These are just some of the questions we answer in our eBook….

 The above is the introduction to our new eBook called “You are What You Drink: A Healthy Beverage Guide” available on smashwords at http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/4830

This eBook contains information on the health benefits and adverse health effects of water, coffee, tea, milk, calorically Sweetened Beverages (soft drinks), non-calorically sweetened beverages (diet soda), fruit and vegetable juices, alcoholic beverages, sports and energy drinks, how to read a nutrition label on a beverage and lots more…

You can visit www.heart-strong.com for more info (Cheers)


Sweetened drinks increase a woman’s risk for heart disease

07/31/2009

 The Nurses Health Study evaluated over 88,000 women aged 34 to 59 over 24 years.  They recently reported that women who drank 2 or more sweetened beverages a day had a 35% increase in their risk for heart disease (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2009).  Sweetened beverages in this study included: Caffeinated and non-caffeinated colas and carbonated beverages with sugar.  The increased risk was not observed with artificially sweetened drinks.  The researchers believe that the sweetened beverages can increase triglycerol levels and this might be the cause of the heart problems.

 Enjoying an occasional sweetened beverage may be okay but – Moderation is Key!

 For more heart healthy info and New Women’s Heart Health book “Take Charge: A Woman’s Guide to a Healthier Heart” visit www.heart-strong.com


Fruit Drinks Increase Your Risk for Diabetes

06/19/2009

 juice-tropical-fruit

Fruit drinks oftentimes are considered a healthier choice that soft drinks but they may actually be more likely to lead to weight gain and diabetes.

 A recent report from the Black Women’s Health Study (published in the Archives of Internal Medicine) which included over 2,700 women found that the higher the intake of sweetened fruit drinks the greater the likelihood of developing diabetes.  Women who consumed two or more sweetened beverages a day were much more likely to develop diabetes than women who consumed fewer than one per month.  The incidence of diabetes is dramatically higher among black women compared to white women and this study points out the importance of avoiding sweetened fruit drinks especially among black women.

 Believe it or not – Fruit drinks often have more calories than sweetened soft drinks.  It’s important to read those food labels!! (Fruit drinks in this study included powdered fruit flavored beverages, fruit flavored beverages, fortified fruit drinks and juices other than orange and grapefruit juice)

 For more heart healthy info visit www.heart-strong.com

Learn More From Our New Book “Take Charge: A Woman’s Guide to a Healthier Heart” available at www.heart-strong.com


Can Diet Soda Make You Fat and Cause Diabetes?

03/18/2009

diet-coke

Yes – Diet soda may actually contribute to weight gain and diabetes!  Diet sodas typically have 5 calories or less per serving but recent studies have found that people who drink diet sodas gain lots of weight.  A study by S. Fowler at the University of Texas reported a 41% increase in risk of being overweight for every can/bottle of diet soda a person has each day.

Health experts do not believe the diet soda causes obesity?? Several theories for the weight gain exist:

·  People drinking diet soda crave other sweet foods and these trigger the weight gain
·  People who drink diet soda are already overweight and have poor eating habits

· When someone drinks a diet soda they think they can treat themselves to other unhealthy food selections (diet soda does not compensate for eating fried/fatty foods)

A report from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (called MESA Study) published in January 2009 in Diabetes Care found that people who drank at least one diet soda daily had a 67% greater risk of developing diabetes.

We know regular soft drinks are unhealthy, now we have data suggesting health risks with regular consumption of diet soda.  Remember moderation is key or better yet drink more H2O….